SHORT COURSES

watermark-min

SHORT COURSES

An exciting range of Short Courses will be run immediately prior to the Conference on August 17, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm and August 18, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. Leading minds from academia and industry will provide short courses targeting:

  1. LC-MS Practical Method Development and Validation
  2. Tandem mass spectrometry
  3. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry
  4. Proteomics and Post-Translational Modifications
  5. Lipidomics
  6. Imaging mass spectrometry
  7. Glycomics
  8. Computational and Statistical proteomic analysis

Discounted Course Fees are provided for:
a) Students and Emerging Country Researchers,
b) Academic Researchers

Limited places are available!*

To secure your place Register here

*There is a limited number of persons that can be accommodated for each short course, so register soon to avoid missing out. 

LC-MS Practical Method Development and Validation

With the expanding use of Mass Spectrometry (MS) in laboratories not specifically focused in analytical chemistry including pharmaceutical, biochemical, biological, or environmental labs there is a growing need for training in the monitoring or assessment of instrument performance to ensure optimal reproducibility and high data quality. While advancements in MS technologies have made instrumentation more robust than ever before this has not removed the need for basic troubleshooting, instrument maintenance and repair skills, which are critical for limiting downtime and providing cost savings to any laboratory. Within this short course we will introduce a basic framework for how to troubleshoot and identify issues with LC-MS instrumentation, including the following areas: basic “best practices,” system suitability and qualification, tuning, calibration, basic troubleshooting and maintenance. Taking a vendor-neutral approach we will cover basic aspects of chromatographic instrument set up as well as general information on the performance characteristics of ion trap, quadrupole, FT, and TOF mass spectrometry platforms. This course seeks to better equip new MS practitioners for success in their use of the technology.

Curtin University

Deakin University

Tandem mass spectrometry techniques 

An increasing array of approaches are available for undertaking Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) on both modified as well as commercially available MS instrumentation. Within this course the basic concepts, operating requirements and performance characteristics of tandem mass spectrometry approaches will be covered. Focusing on the application of these approaches for biomolecules (including metabolites, lipids, peptides, proteins, as well as oligonucleotides) this course is designed for both novice and intermediate MS users with basic working knowledge of mass spectrometry instrumentation, who are interested in the fundamental, instrumental, and practical aspects of tandem mass spectrometry. Across this course, aspects of ion activation and dissociation chemistry, instrument modification considerations, and the different behaviour of collision-induced dissociation (CID), surface-induced dissociation (SID), electron-activated dissociation (ExD), photodissociation, ion-ion and ion-molecule techniques, will be discussed.

Ohio State University

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Ion mobility-mass spectrometry

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is complementary to mass spectrometry, as it provides a separation that reflects the ion structure (not only its mass). With the expanding availability of different commercial ion mobility instruments this tutorial seeks to introduce intermediate and novice MS users with working knowledge of chemistry and mass spectrometry instrumentation on the fundamental aspects of IMS, the instrumental combinations of different types of IMS technologies with MS (i.e., IM-MS), as well as the strengths and interpretation of IMS data. Special focus will be placed on the use of IM-MS for structural assignments in various biological and chemical analysis applications, from small molecules to large biological complexes with critical resources including databases and prediction tools discussed. Using hands-on data processing examples this course seeks to equip users with the tools to leverage IMS to improve their MS analysis.

University of North Carolina

University of Geneva

Proteomics and Post-Translational Modifications

Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry has become the key technology for the characterization of proteins. This course is designed as an introduction to novice and intermediate MS users on the use of mass spectrometry-based methods for the identification, characterization, and quantification of peptides and Post-Translational Modifications (PTMs). In this tutorial an overview of the mass analyzers and acquisition types utilised across proteomic studies for the analysis of proteomics and PTMs will be discussed. Real-world examples will be used to illustrate protein sample preparation strategies, characterization of PTM, identification of proteins using database searching and quantitative approaches for proteomic/PTM analysis focusing on the use of accessible and widely available proteomic tools for interpretation of datasets. Problem sets will be used to emphasize practical aspects of comprehensive protein characterization, including assessing protein identification assignment quality and strategies to improve confidence in potentially biologically relevant protein or PTM alterations.

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

Rosalind Franklin Institute University of Oxford

Lipidomics

Lipidomics is the large-scale study of lipid species and the quantitative assessment of lipid levels across biological systems. Designed for mass spectrometrists at an intermediate or novice MS level with basic chemistry and a working knowledge of mass spectrometry instrumentation this course will provide an introduction to current workflows in lipidomics. Focusing on the experimental design stage to data dissemination, this course will provide the necessary information and resources to adequately design, perform, and analyze data from lipidomics experiments. Covering topics including sample preparation strategies for lipidomics experiments (pre-analytical considerations, use/choice of internal standard, lipid extraction, sample derivatization), LC-MS and direct infusion lipidomics approaches, the advantages of untargeted or targeted lipidomics as well as basics of data handling for lipidomics data sets (quantitation, software tools, structural resolution/annotation, QA/QC, and reporting of data) this course seeks to equip users with the knowledge to tailor their lipidomic experiments to the analysis of different lipids and measurement requirements.

Queensland University of Technology

National University of Singapore

Imaging mass spectrometry

This two-day course aims to introduce users to the basic concepts associated with running an Imaging Mass Spectrometry experiment, including an introduction to the different types of instrumentation, instrumental parameters, sample preparation for biological material and other surfaces including matrix application in the case of MALDI, imaging acquisition data analysis, imaging processing and quantitative aspects. This course will be presented at the beginner to intermediate level, and will be appropriate for mass spectrometrists looking to apply this technology to different kinds of samples, but is also suited for e.g. clinicians/pathologists or material scientists looking to learn more about Imaging Mass Spectrometry. The focus will be on molecular analysis, but other mass spectrometry sources and concepts will be touched as well (e.g. elemental imaging by laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry).

Vienna University of Technology

University of Wollongong

Glycomics

This short course seeks to introduce key concepts in based glycomics and glycoproteomics. Designed for mass spectrometrists at an intermediate or novice MS level with working knowledge of chemistry and mass spectrometry instrumentation this course will introduce current workflows in glycomics / glycoproteomics. The course will provide a historical overview on glycan analysis as well as introduce the Symbol Nomenclature for Glycans (SNFG) framework. Within this tutorial topics associated with the design of glycomic/glycoproteomic experiments including sample preparation strategies (enrichment of glycans/glycopeptides, the release of glycans, enzymatic approaches to assign glycan linkages), data collection techniques as well as considerations of using specific MS instrumentation (QTOF/Orbi/ion traps as well as CID vs ETD), glycan/glycopeptide identification strategies (MS/MS, database matching, levels of identification certainty) as well as basics of data handling for these data sets (quantitation, software tools and reporting of data) will be covered. At the conclusion of this course users will be equipped with the knowledge to assess the assignment of a glycan/glycopeptide and identify the key parameters which enable confidence in the assignment.

Texas Tech University

Griffith University

Computational and Statistical Proteomic Analysis

The growth of biological MS deepens the need to understand computation and statistics; these skills are essential for the interpretation of proteomic studies. Designed for mass spectrometrists at an intermediate level, this course incorporates real-world use cases for the computational tools used to identify and quantify proteins/peptides. This tutorial will emphasize the design of well-powered studies, the conceptional frameworks associated with the identification of peptides and PTMs, and the detection and quantitation of biological differences. Participants will be introduced to methods for visualising and interpreting datasets, including statistical techniques using common bioinformatics tools such as the R statistical environment. At the conclusion of this course participants should have a working understanding of the key considerations associated with computational analysis of proteomic datasets.

University Medical Center Groningen

University of California San Francisco (UCSF)

Buck Institute for Research on Aging

DR ROBERT TRENGOVE

Curtin University
Australia

Rob has been using mass spectrometers for around 30 years and has taught separation science and mass spectrometry-based courses in Australian and New Zealand capital cities, Singapore and Malaysia for universities and industry and he has collaborated with several instrument companies during this time and beta tested GC/MS and LC//MS systems. Rob has carried out research in oil and gas thermodynamics and analysis, supercritical fluid extraction and chromatography on plants and metal complexes, metabolomics on plant systems, cellular systems, animals and humans, and diagnostic peptide analysis for human diseases.  Rob has taught undergraduate and postgraduate chemistry, analytical methods, applied thermodynamics, separation science, mass spectrometry and pharmaceutical chemistry.   Rob established a NATA accredited ISO 17025 laboratory for pesticide residue analysis in food.  Rob is currently teaching post graduate researchers sample preparation,  LC/MS method development and developing methods for regulatory fields.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DAMIEN CALLAHAN

Deakin University
Australia

Damien is an Associate Professor of Chemistry in the School of Life and Environmental sciences at Deakin University. He has worked in HPLC and Mass Spectrometry in industry and academia for 25 years. He now teaches undergraduate analytical science and his research involves metabolomics, persistent and emerging contaminants, chemical ecology and analytical method development, all of which utilise mass spectrometry.

PROFESSOR VICKI WYSOCKI

Ohio State University
USA

Professor Vicki H. Wysocki is an Ohio Eminent Scholar, Director of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center, and Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the Ohio State University. She is Director and PI of an NIH-funded Biomedical Technology Optimization and Dissemination Center in Native Mass Spectrometry.

Dr. Wysocki received her BS in Chemistry at Western Kentucky University in 1982 and her PhD in Chemistry at Purdue University in 1987. She was a postdoc at the Naval Research Laboratory (National Research Council fellow) and joined Virginia Commonwealth University as an Assistant Professor in 1990. Dr. Wysocki joined the University of Arizona in 1996, was promoted to Professor in 2000, and served as Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Professor Wysocki served as VP Programs, President, and Past President of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2014-2020) and as an Associate Editor for Analytical Chemistry (2015-2022). Dr. Wysocki was appointed as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry in July 2022. Major awards include the International Mass Spectrometry Foundation’s Thomson Medal, the ACS Field and Franklin Award, the ACS Analytical Division Chemical Instrumentation Award, and the ASMS Distinguished Contribution Award.

DR LJILJANA PAŠA-TOLIĆ

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
USA

Ljiljana (Lili) Paša-Tolić received her PhD in Chemistry at the University of Zagreb in Croatia, was a postdoctoral fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and visiting scientist at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Today she is a Laboratory Fellow and Lead Scientist at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at PNNL. She is known for her pioneering contributions to mass spectrometry, high-throughput, and top-down proteomics, including the development of transformative instrumentation and methods for biological and environmental research. Dr. Paša-Tolić has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed publications; presented at more than 150 seminars, conferences, and workshops; and served at numerous editorial and advisory committees. She was a founding organizer to the worldwide Consortium for Top-Down Proteomics (CTDP), a nonprofit corporation that works toward the goal of accelerating “the comprehensive analysis of intact proteins and their complexes” and is currently serving on the CTDP Board. She has mentored more than 50 students and post-doctoral fellows, and organized several conferences, workshops, symposia, and schools focused on various aspects of analytical chemistry, omics, and mass spectrometry. In 2019 and 2021, she was selected for the Analytical Scientist Top 100 Power List, recognizing her pioneering contributions to high resolution mass spectrometry for applications ranging from environmental ecology to medicine. In 2021, she was selected to join the Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS) and is currently serving on the WSAS Board.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR ERIN S. BAKER

University of North Carolina
USA

Erin S. Baker is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. To date, she has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers utilizing different analytical chemistry techniques to study both environmental and biological systems. Over the last 4 years, Erin also helped grow the Females in Mass Spectrometry group, where she served as the Events Committee Chair from 2019-2022. She is currently serving as the Vice President of Education for the International Lipidomics Society, a mentor for Females in Mass Spectrometry, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry. She has received seven US patents, two R&D 100 Awards, been named to the 2019, 2021 and 2023 Analytical Scientist Top 100 Power Lists, and was a recipient of the 2016 ACS Rising Star Award for Top Midcareer Women Chemists, 2022 ASMS Biemann Medal, and 2022 IMSF Curt Brunnée Award. Currently, her research group utilizes advanced separations and novel software capabilities to examine how chemical exposure affects human health.

PROFESSOR VALERIE GABELICA

University of Geneva
Belgium

Valérie Gabelica obtained her B.Sc. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Science in 2002 from the University of Liège in Belgium. After a postdoc in Frankfurt as a Von Humboldt Foundation fellow, she returned to Belgium and obtained a permanent position as a FNRS Research Associate in 2005. In 2013, she joined the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology (IECB, Bordeaux) and became Inserm Research Director in December 2013 (promoted first class in 2023). She served as the director of the IECB from 2021 to 2023. In January 2024, she moved to the University of Geneva as a Full Professor. Her main research interests are fundamental aspects of mass spectrometry and its application to non-covalent complexes, and nucleic acid complexes in particular, with research themes spanning from physical chemistry to biophysics and structural chemistry and biology.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SEAN HUMPHREY

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute
Australia

Sean has contributed to the fields of proteomics and signal transduction by developing scalable and efficient phosphoproteomics methods for studying global protein phosphorylation and by applying these to study cell signalling in diverse biological fields. In 2014 he received an EMBO postdoctoral fellowship and undertook post-doctoral training with Professor Matthias Mann at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Martinsried, Germany). He has co-authored several landmark studies in the field of phosphoproteomics, including the first time-resolved analyses of insulin signalling, circadian rhythms in vivo. In 2016 he joined the University of Sydney, where he further developed methods that facilitate the pinpointing of functionally-linked signalling identified in large in vivo phosphoproteomics studies. In 2023 he joined the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute as head of the Functional Phosphoproteomics Laboratory, where he is applying mass spectrometry-based technologies to identify new treatments for childhood diseases.

PROFESSOR SHABAZ MOHAMMED

Rosalind Franklin Institute University of Oxford
United Kingdom

Shabaz studied Chemistry at UMIST (now The University of Manchester) and obtained his degree in 1999. He then went on to work in the laboratory of Simon Gaskell within the field of biological mass spectrometry albeit the more fundamental side of the topic and defended in early 2003. He then moved to Odense (Denmark) and joined the group of Ole Jensen and worked on technology development for use in studying post-translation modifications. Here, he helped develop a method that allowed quantitative analysis of phosphorylation and its role in cellular signalling, a widely adopted method. In 2005, he moved to the laboratory of Albert Heck and continued working in the field of proteomic technologies. In 2008, he became an Assistant Professor and started his own group. In 2013, he (once again) moved and is now an Associate Professor of Proteomics in the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry. In 2020, he was seconded to the Rosalind Franklin Institute where he will be Head of the Mechanistic Proteomics research programme.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN BANKSBY

Queensland University of Technology
Australia

Stephen Blanksby completed his PhD (1999, U. Adelaide) in the field of gas phase ion chemistry before undertaking postdoctoral research in Europe (1999, TU Berlin) and the USA (2000-2002, U. Colorado). He held a faculty position in the School of Chemistry at U. Wollongong (Wollongong, Australia, 2002-2013) before relocating to the Queensland University of Technology (Brisbane, Australia 2014-present) where he is currently Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research Infrastructure). Stephen’s research is focussed on putting the fun back into fundamental gas phase ion chemistry and developing new applications in analytical mass spectrometry with a focus on lipidomics. He is an enthusiastic advocate for mass spectrometry within the international community serving as associate editor of the International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and vice-President of the International Mass Spectrometry Foundation.

DR ANNE K. BENDT

National University of Singapore
Singapore

Dr Anne K Bendt is Principal Investigator and Deputy Director at SLING, the Singapore Lipidomics Incubator, an internationally renowned R&D program in lipid research and technology development, anchored at the National University of Singapore. She focusses on the translation of mass spectrometry-based technologies into clinical applications, primarily for lipids and small molecules.
Anne is further passionate about training and education, and has made substantial contributions to SLING’s various workshops and ‘ic lipid’ training courses. Internationally, Anne is co-instructor of ‘Lipidomics 101’, a short course for clinical lipidomics.
With clinical translation close to her heart, Anne serves on the ‘Metabolomics’ working group within the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC). She further serves on the steering committee of ‘Clinical Lipidomics’ within the International Lipidomics Society (ILS) and as Associate Editor for ‘Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Advances in the Clinical Lab’ (JMSACL). Early 2019 Anne co-founded the global initiative ‘Females in Mass Spectrometry’ (FeMS), serving as Chair on the Board.

PROFESSOR MARTINA MARCHETTI-DESCHMANN

Vienna University of Technology
Austria

Prof. Martina Marchetti-Deschmann is Full Professor for Mass Spectrometric Methods / Analytical Chemistry at the TU Wien, where she is heading the Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics and the Research Group of Mass Spectrometric Bio- and Polymer Analysis in the Research Division of Imaging and Instrumental Analytical Chemistry at the. She obtained her PhD in Chemistry at the University of Vienna and is working in the field of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry for over 20 years. Her research is focusing on mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques for biomolecule identification, quantification, detailed characterization and spatial localization. Her research areas include laser-based Analytical Chemistry, in particular laser-assisted mass spectrometry. Her group was the first lab that combined molecular and elemental imaging in multi-instrument approaches on the same tissue section to overcome spatial artifacts (MS & Infrared, (Immuno)histology, Fluorescence, XRF or AFM, but also MALDI & LA-ICP MSI).  Today, Martina is an internationally recognized expert for instrument advances and innovative methodologies to put multi-measurements of a sample into practice to gather comprehensive information down to the cellular level. Martina seeks to advance mass spectrometric research, education and professionalization. Besides other activities she is board member of the International Mass Spectrometry Foundation (IMSF) and founding member of the MS Imaging Society (MSIS), being also president since 2021 of the latter. She published over 146 peer-reviewed articles, 7 book chapters and holds three patents. Martina received the eLearning Award at TU Wien in 2010, was awarded the Beynon Prize from the Journal “Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry” in 2007 and the Fritz Feigl Prize in 2013 awarded by the Austrian Society of Analytical Chemistry (ASAC). 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SHANE ELLIS

University of Wollongong
Australia

Bio: A/ProfShane R. Ellis obtained his PhD from the University of Wollongong (UOW) in 2013 and is currently an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at UOW where he leads the Mass Spectrometry Imaging Group within the Molecular Horizons Institute. His research has won numerous awards including the “NVMS award for outstanding research” from Netherlands Mass Spectrometry Society in 2019 and the Jochen Franzen award for “For outstanding contributions to innovations in structural, spatial and/or separation analysis with mass spectrometry” from the International Mass Spectrometry Foundation in 2022. From 2014-2019 he was tenured Assistant Professor at the Maastricht MultiModal Molecular Imaging Institute (M4I) at Maastricht University and led the Instrumentation and Application Development Group within the Division for Imaging Mass Spectrometry. Preceding this was a two-year postdoctoral research position FOM-AMOLF in Amsterdam where he worked on the development of Timepix active pixel detectors for various ion imaging applications. His research focuses on both the continued development of MSI technologies and their application to studying region-specific metabolism in tissues and cells, with a particular focus on lipidomics. In recent years his group has pioneered the development of various new MSI technologies enabling access to new analyte classes as well as enhanced spatial and molecular resolution.

PROFESSOR YEHIA MECHREF

Texas Tech University
USA

Prof. Yehia Mechref, the esteemed Robert A. Welch Endowed Chair in Chemistry, Paul W. Horn Distinguished Professor, Associate Vice President for Research and Innovation, and Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Genomics at Texas Tech University, is a leading authority in biomolecular mass spectrometry. With a B.Sc. from the American University of Beirut and a Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University, Mechref’s unique and innovative methods have revolutionized the study of diseases, contributing to significant advancements in diagnostics and treatments. His work underscores the crucial role of proteins, glycoproteins, and glycans in medical research, earning him global recognition.

At Texas Tech, Mechref’s dedication to international collaboration and academic excellence has significantly enhanced the university’s standing in the scientific community. A sought-after speaker, his lectures across Europe and Africa highlight Texas Tech’s commitment to global scientific dialogue. Under his guidance, the Mechref Omics Lab has emerged as a vital center for research and education, attracting scholars worldwide to its advanced training sessions.

Mechref’s pivotal role in fostering international partnerships is evident in his collaborations with over 300 scientists from diverse institutions worldwide. These extensive efforts not only showcase his influence but also underline his unwavering dedication to promoting scientific innovation and knowledge sharing across borders. Additionally, his role as a respected reviewer for major international funding agencies further underscores the trust and respect he commands in the scientific community.

Mechref’s prolific contributions to science include over 42 review articles, 24 book chapters, and 245 peer-reviewed papers, highlighted by a Google Scholar h-index 74. His leadership extends to editorial positions and committee memberships, further demonstrating his impact on cancer research, chemistry, and biochemistry. His receipt of prestigious awards, including the 2019 TTU President’s Academic Achievement Award and the Nancy Bell Faculty Excellence in Mentoring Award, reflects his commitment to excellence and mentorship.

Prof. Mechref’s work exemplifies the power of dedicated research and collaboration in advancing scientific understanding and improving global health outcomes. His contributions to Texas Tech and the wider scientific community have made him a pivotal figure in his fields of mass spectrometry-based glycomics and glycoproteomics.

PROFESSOR DANIEL KOLARICH

Griffith University
Australia

Originally from Vienna, Austria, Daniel has been fortunate to have the chance to learn from great mentors and scientists. His scientific journey took him from his hometown Vienna, where he received his PhD, via a post-doctoral fellowship to Sydney at Macquarie University before he got the opportunity to join the Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces as a group leader and start his independent career. In 2017 he returned to Australia as an ACR Future fellow and joined the Institute for Glycomics at Griffith University as a research leader to establish the Advanced Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, and now Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF) International Centre for Cancer Glycomics. His team is dedicated to developing and using glycomics and glycoproteomics, two technologies that allow translation the glyco-code of cells, to decipher how glycosylation is involved in the regulation and pathogenesis of diseases such as cancer, but also in stem cell signalling as well as the evolution of the glyco-code in animals. This fundamental understanding of the glyco-code regulation opens unprecedented opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer, but also delivers valuable insights into the transmission pathways of zoonotic pathogens.

PROFESSOR DAVID TABB

University Medical Center Groningen
USA

Prof. David Tabb has been teaching mass spectrometry bioinformatics since 2003, when he acquired his Ph.D.  With research emphases in MS/MS-based identification of peptides and proteoforms and in quality assessment of LC-MS/MS, he has often found his work strays into the field of biostatistics.  He has taught short courses for the International Mass Spectrometry Conference, the American Society of Mass Spectrometry, the Human Proteomics Organization, and the Association for Biomolecular Resource Facilities.  The trainings he has conducted in the developing world has been particularly meaningful for him.

 

Technology assessment is a recurring theme in Dr. Tabb’s research.  Working with the US National Cancer Institute “CPTAC” program, he published papers on the reproducibility of LC-MS/MS identification and on the reproducible detection of proteomic differences.  He has examined top-down proteoform identification algorithms for the EPIC-XS program.  He has joined with other researchers in proteome meta-analysis, combining data from multiple repository studies for a broader perspective on study reproducibility.

 

Dr. Tabb looks forward to working with Dr. Birgit Schilling again and to meeting the course participants at Melbourne!

PROFESSOR BIRGIT SCHILLING

University of California San Francisco (UCSF)
USA

Dr. Birgit Schilling has worked at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2000 as Professor and Director of the Mass Spectrometry Technology Center, specifically focusing on data independent acquisition technologies and large-scale proteome quantification. Dr. Schilling received her Ph.D. in Germany and then moved to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) as a postdoctoral fellow. Dr. Schilling is interested in translational research and research that may aim toward therapeutic interventions to improve human aging or age-related diseases, specifically osteoarthritis, kidney injury and cancer. Dr. Schilling uses modern proteomic technologies to investigate mechanisms of aging, senescence and cancer and using this knowledge to develop biomarkers and targets for interventions.

DR. JORDAN BURTON

Buck Institute for Research on Aging
USA

Jordan is a postdoctoral research scientist in the Schilling Lab at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. With a strong background in chemistry, his research focuses on deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related diseases through mass spectrometry-based proteomics and bioinformatics pipelines. He is directly involved in multiple translational scientific research projects spanning neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, kidney, and bone disease. He uses his expertise in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics to acquire and analyze large datasets allowing efficient quantification of changes in protein abundance in biological samples. His experience spans multiple translational scientific projects such as analyzing a large human breast cancer cohort and acute kidney injury models in mice and non-human primates to identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, he is dedicated to advancing novel data visualization and communication techniques that enable non-MS-experts and biological collaborators to appreciate meaningful differences between groups.